Saturday, September 29, 2012

Hey Execs, Pay Attention!



For a bunch of people that care about making money, it appears as though they would prefer to just follow their own lead and do things how they want.  Of course, I am talking about the programming directors of Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon.  I am not even going to bother addressing Disney Channel because they are way too far gone.  Now, it appears as though they are just ignoring the fans and doing what they think is best.  In this case, what they think is best is totally and abysmally wrong. 
                Here is a quick history of the competition of the three major networks from the 1990s to today.  Disney Channel specialized in TV programming based on its multiple “Disney Masterpiece” movies.  These include The Lion King, Aladdin, Hercules, The Little Mermaid and others.  Nickelodeon featured original programming such as Rugrats and Hey Arnold as well as the edgier shows Rocko’s Modern Life and The Ren and Stimpy Show.  For a time, Nickelodeon featured Looney Tunes and other retro cartoons, before the rights were bought by Cartoon Network.  Cartoon Network had Tom and Jerry and other original programming such as Johnny Bravo, Dexter’s Laboratory and The Powerpuff Girls.  Also, they had the Japanese anime block, Toonami.  I accredit the year 2006 as the beginning of the dark times.  This was the year that the Disney Channel released High School Musical.  For all that movie’s faults, it changed the landscape of children’s television.  Disney Channel created pop culture icons that were worshipped as heroes by kids of all ages.  Nickelodeon, in effort to keep ratings, started creating the icons too at the expense of the proven shows. After a few years of this gallivanting about like a bunch of morons, Nickelodeon made a few acquisitions.  The additions of the entirety of the Power Rangers franchise in time for the 20th anniversary season, Avatar: The Legend of Korra, and Dragon Ball Z Kai/Dragon Ball GT forced the other networks to begin making changes as well.  Cartoon Network began airing Adventure Time, Regular Show, The Amazing World of Gumball, and Problem Solverz.  Today, we find ourselves in the process of phasing out of the pop idol stage and returning to the days of animated comedy, rather than poorly acted comedy.
                Now back to the topic at hand, in the modern day, Cartoon Network is without a doubt winning out for the teenage and youth audiences.  So now, here I am to recommend things that the Execs at Nick can do to pull up its ratings:
1.       Create a grittier Power Rangers reboot for the season after Megaforce.  If it is rebooted as what it was with new graphics, in HD, and a grittier story line more aimed at the 18-25 age group, it would pull in tons of money in advertising.
2.       Drag on Avatar: The Legend of Korra for as long as you can.   It doesn’t matter how rediculus the storylines get, we will religiously follow the show.  I can guarantee that.
3.       Keep Dragon Ball to yourself.  And heck, while you’re at it, acquire Naruto, One Piece and other popular anime.  Nickelodeon needs programs like this to keep Cartoon Network fans away from Cartoon Network.
4.       Develop darker and edgier shows.  This is the reason that people watch Cartoon Network on Mondays.  The back-to-back combo of Adventure Time and Regular Show is dynamic.  Get shows like this (well you already made the terrific move of giving up Adventure Time) and you will remove some of Cartoon Network’s viewers. 
5.       Pay Saban whatever he wants to keep Power Rangers after Megaforce.  True, he may want to keep Vortexx with the rights, but the capability of running two new seasons of Power Rangers simultaneously would make him more money than one at eight in the morning on the CW.  Bonus points, create your own rangers or use pre-Zyuranger Super Sentai footage. 
Cartoon Network, just sure up that noon time slot to something that could compete against any season of Power Rangers and you win.  And I WILL be in contact about that.

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